Media Coverage

Media Coverage

City A.M.
| Labour's plans to crackdown on private equity are only the beginning of the political dog fight

Political interest in private equity has ramped up over the last year.

After a string of high-profile political interventions on recent PE deals, from defence to retail, the Labour Party has made it their mission to scrap the carried interest tax rules that PE fund managers benefit from. Returns would no longer be booked as capital gains (taxed at 28 per cent) but as income (at 45 per cent).

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Financial Times
| FCA says 'we are learning' when it comes to online scams

The Financial Conduct Authority’s chief executive officer has said the regulator is still learning about how to deal with digital entrants to financial services but its work would be made easier by tighter legislation.

Speaking at Global Counsel’s event yesterday (July 14), Nikhil Rathi was asked if the FCA had the framework and firepower to properly regulate digital entrants to the market.

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The Times
| Focus on the cost of net zero has been a long time coming

Evaluating the costs associated with the UK’s goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 deserves far greater attention. It suddenly entered the fray last week when Rishi Sunak, the chancellor, was asked who would be expected to pay the touted £1 trillion cost — including £10,000 per home to replace gas boilers — in an interview with Andrew Neil.

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The Times
| Planning reforms on their own will not achieve a levelling-up

Central to Boris Johnson’s political sense of self is the notion that he is a “Brexity Hezza”: “Brexity” because he led the charge for the UK’s exit from the European Union; and “Hezza” because, like Michael Heseltine, his political passion is regenerating parts of the country that have suffered years of post-industrial decline — the policy known as “levelling-up”, even if precise definitions of it are hard to come by.

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City A.M.
| Keir Starmer was right on one thing in his reshuffle - we need a Future of Work Secretary

After a poor set of local election results and a botched reshuffle, Labour hasn’t had the best of weeks. But one thing it may have gotten right is the appointment of Angela Rayner as “shadow secretary for the future of work”. While it is easy to mock the elaborate titles bestowed on the deputy leader after she was sacked from as party chair and national campaign coordinator, her brief is nothing to scoff at. The Conservative party would do well to appoint their own equivalent to sit on the front benches. 

Until recently, concerns about the impact of technology on the workplace have largely focused on the so-called “gig economy”. This nebulous term refers to a whole range of jobs typically characterised by insecure and generally low-paid employment mediated by digital platforms – think ride-hailing, food delivery and courier services. 

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